Fashion Week 2017

Popping The Fashion Bubble

Lichting 2017 by Trendpit

The fashion industry is changing rapidly; the speed and dynamics of collections transformed into an even higher tempo. This creates an opportunity for consumers to reinvent their visual identity and appearance everyday. Besides, Internet and social media changed the way we display, express and shape our identity. We now have another online identity, which we can construct the way we want to. The combination of mass production and online identities created the fashion bubble we’re currently living in: we want to be the first to find the most fashionable items to suit our self-controlled identity, and are sometimes more aware of our digital apperances than the physical ones. The distinction between real and fake fades, and we forget what’s going on in the real world.

This MBFWA several designers shared their vision on fashion consumption and production. How do we want to shape our identity in days of mass production and selfie sticks? What is real and what is fake? And how do we pop this bubble?

During the Lichting 2017 the fourteen best graduates of 2017 from the seven Dutch fashion academies were chosen to show their collections. Several graduates focussed on self-expression and an individual view on fashion in times of mass production.

Lichting2017 by Trendpit

Lichting2017 by Trendpit

Roos Boshart (Royal Academy of Art, The Hague) showed deconstructed iconic pieces by creating a different context. For example: putting them in vacuum plastic. The collection ‘I am a slave of your perception, you are a slave of mine’ is about showing those pieces in their simplest form, to enable the public to review them and create their own opinion about the pieces.

Roos Boshart by Peter Stigter

Roos Boshart by Peter Stigter

 

Simone Schampers (AMFI Amsterdam Fashion Institute) showed her collection ‘Une grande star d’ un petit cirque, Daddy’s little girl’. Her inspiration was a girl who wants to escape a circus, and dreams about the Haute Couture dresses of visitors. Schampers wants to escape the fast fashion industry by showing the beauty of craftmanship, and wants consumers to become conscious of the way they express their identity in times of mass production.

Simone Schampers by Trendpit

Simone Schampers by Trendpit

 

Some designers shared their vision on digital identities.

Sterre Troquay, the youngest designer ever taking a part in Fashion Week, showed us her fascination with the digital world. In her collection, she blurred the line between real and fake; the models wore henna tattooed shoes, had washing labels tattooed on them and cut out shirts glued to their bodies. Her collection, called ‘avatar’, is about modern surrealism in digital times. With this collection, and the surrealistic elements she focussed on the second identity people can control in virtual life games or social media.

Sterre Troquay by Peter Stigter

Sterre Troquay by Peter Stigter

 

Esther van Brakel (Willem de Kooning Rotterdam) showed her digital clothing line ‘SELFIE_FASHION_1.jpg’ during the Lichting 2017 show. The models wore nothing more than underwear and the screen showed the screens of the models taking selfies while walking. The models used the app ‘Dressapp’; the application digitally dressed the models, so the collection could only be seen on the screen. The collection is about how our visibility is shifting from a physical to a digital dimension. It allows consumers to only digitally take part in trends.

Esther van Brakel by Peter Stigter

Esther van Brakel by Peter Stigter

 

All designers question the current fashion industry and are looking for ways to pop the fashion bubble. They want to create awareness on how the virtual world and its growing possibilities influence the way we express and shape our identity. To pop the bubble we will have to think for ourselves and create our own opinions without following the bigger mass. It doesn’t matter how you celebrate fashion and express your identity as long as you stay aware of your own judgement in the real world. Let’s pop this bubble!

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